Discussion: Reading Slumps

Sometimes I get in a kind of mood where I don’t want to do any kind of reading.  I’ll waste hours on the computer, binge watch Game of Thrones, do 2000 piece puzzles, anything just to keep from reading.  Usually these moods come about after reading a particularly bad or difficult book, the kind that makes you feel like reading is work rather than pleasure.  As a book blogger who generally writes 4 reviews per week this can present a problem.

When I’m in a reading slump I either do one of two things: wait for it to pass on its own or try to motivate myself by reading a book from my TBR pile that could be really good.  Both of these strategies generally work for me but there have been times when they haven’t.

Have you guys ever had reading slumps?  If so, what did you do to get out of the slump?  And if you’re a book blogger, how do reading slumps affect your blogging?

Mistress of Rome by Kate Quinn

Mistress of Rome by Kate Quinn(Cover picture courtesy of Kate Quinn’s website.)

An exciting debut: a vivid, richly imagined saga of ancient Rome from a masterful new voice in historical fiction

Thea is a slave girl from Judaea, passionate, musical, and guarded. Purchased as a toy for the spiteful heiress Lepida Pollia, Thea will become her mistress’s rival for the love of Arius the Barbarian, Rome’s newest and most savage gladiator. His love brings Thea the first happiness of her life-that is quickly ended when a jealous Lepida tears them apart.

As Lepida goes on to wreak havoc in the life of a new husband and his family, Thea remakes herself as a polished singer for Rome’s aristocrats. Unwittingly, she attracts another admirer in the charismatic Emperor of Rome. But Domitian’s games have a darker side, and Thea finds herself fighting for both soul and sanity. Many have tried to destroy the Emperor: a vengeful gladiator, an upright senator, a tormented soldier, a Vestal Virgin. But in the end, the life of the brilliant and paranoid Domitian lies in the hands of one woman: the Emperor’s mistress.

After reading and enjoying Kate Quinn’s latest series, the Borgia Chronicles, I decided to go back and try some of her earlier works.  I mean, she wrote about Renaissance Rome well, so why not ancient Rome too?

As it turns out, Kate Quinn is comfortable in either era.  I was surprised the most by her writing, which makes you feel like you’re there.  You can hear the roaring cheers in the arena, smell the stench of Rome in summer, etc.  Her writing isn’t as polished in her debut as it is in her other books but I still really enjoyed it and she is still very good.

I like how she wound history and her own story seamlessly into a coherent narrative.  Of course there’s no evidence for some of the stuff that happens in the novel but Kate Quinn acknowledges that in her Historical Note and explains her reasons for adding or leaving out certain things.  In the end, she gets the feeling of the period across to the reader and has obviously done her research about the details of ancient Roman daily life.  That’s what’s really important to me with historical fiction.

Her characters are most definitely memorable, Thea especially.  I’m a sucker for the person who (sometimes unintentionally) goes from the lowest position possible in society to being the most highly coveted society figure as Thea does.  Still, being the Emperor Domitian’s mistress isn’t all it’s cracked up to be and suddenly all of the separate paths of the narrative start to collide.  It was interesting to see how each person Kate Quinn gave readers an insight into took part in the plot, even Lepida (in her own way).  On the surface some of these characters are simply archetypes but Kate Quinn gives them so much depth that you barely notice.

This is a really good novel considering it was a debut novel and I can’t wait to read the rest of Kate Quinn’s Rome series.

I give this book 4.5/5 stars.

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Zombies vs. Robots: No Man’s Land by Jeff Conner

Zombies Vs. Robots(Cover picture courtesy of PREVIEWSworld.)

Book #5 in IDW’s shambling series of original Zombies vs Robots prose collections. Fully illustrated by the fantabulous Fabio Listrani, this new anthology features fresh tales of rotting flesh and rusting metal, undead unrest and mechanical mayhem. Once again IDW expands the apocalyptic hellscape of its unique signature franchise. A world where brain-eaters roam and warbots rule is truly a No Man’s Land.

[Full disclosure: I received a free ebook copy of this book through NetGalley from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.]

I normally would have never given an anthology like this a second glance.  But I was invited to by the publisher so I figured I had nothing to lose.  If I’m honest, I thought the whole thing sounded kind of stupid but I’ve always tried to keep an open mind about literature so I gave it a try anyway.

Am I glad I did?  Well I haven’t exactly found my new favourite series but at the same time I’m glad I gave this book a chance.  It wasn’t as awful as I was expecting it to be.  Instead, there were some very intelligent, believable and well-written stories about a world where zombies roam and robots meant to protect people from said zombies have gone rogue.  This isn’t a random collection of individual story threads like the disastrous V-Wars anthology was, thankfully.  No, each story picks up where the other one left off in the narrative of the zombie takeover and robot intervention.  In the beginning there are stories when zombies are just starting to become a threat and by the end we’re in a fully post-apocalyptic time.

Most of the stories were very well-written.  Others could have been better, but there were no stories that truly stood out as bad.  The pacing is very good for most of them and the overall plot arc is fast-paced.  This isn’t the sort of book you’ll race to read in one sitting, but it is good enough to keep you reading for a while to find out what’s going to happen next in this world where zombies and robots roam.

The characters were generally well fleshed-out.  There were some pretty stereotypical characters (like the ditzy girls in one story) but overall the characters were believable and changed as much as can be expected in the course of a short story.  None of the characters stood out as truly memorable for me, but that may be more of a personal thing than an issue with the writing.

If you think the idea behind this anthology sounds interesting, I’d say go for it!  It’s not the type of book I’m really into but for the right audience this could be a great thrill ride.

I give this book 4/5 stars.

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The Lion and the Rose by Kate Quinn

The Lion and the Rose by Kate Quinn(Cover picture courtesy of Goodreads.)

As the cherished concubine of the Borgia Pope Alexander VI, Giulia Farnese has Rome at her feet. But after narrowly escaping a sinister captor, she realizes that the danger she faces is far from over—and now, it threatens from within. The Holy City of Rome is still under Alexander’s thrall, but enemies of the Borgias are starting to circle. In need of trusted allies, Giulia turns to her sharp-tongued bodyguard, Leonello, and her fiery cook and confidante, Carmelina.

Caught in the deadly world of the Renaissance’s most notorious family, Giulia, Leonello, and Carmelina must decide if they will flee the dangerous dream of power. But as the shadows of murder and corruption rise through the Vatican, they must learn who to trust when every face wears a mask . . .

I had my doubts about The Lion and the Rose but in the end it exceeded my expectations.  Kate Quinn captures a time of change and uncertainty perfectly while having her beloved characters navigate through the vicious politics of Rome.

Kate Quinn’s characters are great.  Giulia is finally a mature woman who starts to realize that maybe her beloved Pope isn’t all that he seems to be.  His personality is changing and Giulia now has the maturity and insight to see and acknowledge some of his failings as a person.  I don’t want to add in too many spoilers, but this new knowledge drastically changes their relationship as well as both parties involved.  Leonello was the character that surprised me the most in this book, however.  He’s finally trying to be just a little bit nicer to everyone but he still has that biting wit that makes me love him.  Where his character goes toward the end of the book was a total shock but in hindsight I should have seen it coming.  Carmelina also has quite the interesting character arc, but I was definitely more interested in Giulia’s and Leonello’s.

I can’t vouch for the historical accuracy of this novel because my knowledge of the era is woefully inadequate, but Kate Quinn included a nice historical note talking about the very few things she did change.  She seamlessly wove history and invention together to tell a great story while remaining true to the tiny details and broader strokes of the period.  For example, all of the recipes mentioned in the book are authentic as well as the religious unrest in Florence.  This is how historical fiction should be written.

By most standards the plot is not fast-paced but this is more of a character driven novel.  There are still some very surprising plot twists, particularly the ones involving Leonello, so you’ll never be bored.  And of course Kate Quinn’s writing style is excellent, as always.  Historical fiction doesn’t get much better than this.

I give this book 5/5 stars.

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